Saturday 26th May

10.30 – 12.30

The Haifa Home in Israel for Holocaust Survivors opened around 2010 in a small building where a businessman started housing 14 survivors he had encountered at a soup kitchen. He was shocked to see in the soup line elderly people with tattooed number from Auschwitz, Treblinka and other concentration camps.

In 2009 Simon approached the Christian Embassy in Jerusalem requesting help to buy the ground floor of another building. The embassy quickly responded and proposed buying the whole building, supplying the funding – thus the expansion of the Haifa House began.

The waiting list of needy holocaust survivors is nearly 2000 people and with the rise of Anti-Semitism worldwide more are expected to join the list as Jews are being helped by the Christian Embassy to make it back to Israel.

Though fragile today the holocaust survivors did bring the will to live to the land of Israel and her birthing … and there will be plenty of stories on the notice boards of their survivor skills and the work they accomplished. These show common threads to their stories – education cut short, years of starvation, catastrophic loss of loved ones, relentless terror, forced to do the unimaginable, helplessness in extreme cruelty. Many were too exhausted and destroyed to go on – but not all.
Research shows that survivors who were able to prevail share similar character traits – resiliency, adaptability, resourcefulness, initiative and tenacity. Those attributes are difficult to teach, but were precisely those needed to build the new state of Israel.

Research shows that survivors who were able to prevail share simi- lar character traits – resiliency, adaptability, resourcefulness, initia- tive and tenacity. Those attributes are difficult to teach, but were precisely those needed to build the new state of Israel.

To sum up, holocaust survivors are normal people who survived the horrific, who, coping with their own trauma built their own lives as well as the life of one of the most remarkable nations on earth.
Many holocaust survivors who were children and young teens in WW2 are now living the final season of their lives. This is our last chance to make a positive difference to their lives that began in
severe adversity and abject cruelty. We were not there at their desperate beginning but we can give them our love and support now for a different end.

Work is starting on a purpose built intensive care facility – not as we know intensive care but people with ongoing health problems and progressing debility from years of malnutrition now needing 24 hour care.

So, if you can come on Saturday 26th May between 10.30 and 12.30 you will be very welcome and show our support for this deserving cause.

Thank you

Jean Johnston